Home Water Pressure Flow Basics

 In Uncategorized

Problems with water pressure are one of the more annoying things that can go wrong in a house. Showers become less satisfying and dishes are even more of a chore than usual. A lot of homeowners live with these and many other water problems, simply because they aren’t aware of how to fix them (or prevent them in the first place). There are, however, many options available to change your water pressure from bad to good.  Some of these fixes are the most basic things that anyone can manage.  Others are more technical.  Read on to learn more – who knows you may learn that your shower can be fixed in a jiff and become much more enjoyable.

Urban Water Pressure
Most people get their water from a municipal water company. In the main lines underground, the water pressure is very high. Due to friction, this water loses its pressure between the main line and your home. It loses still more pressure between where it enters the home and the faucet it comes out of. The smaller the space is for the water to move through, the more friction there will be. If water has low pressure when it comes out of a faucet, it means that somewhere between the main line and your sink, the water is experiencing too much friction.

Sometimes, the excess friction is caused by pipes being too small in the first place. A pipe that is 1/2 inch in diameter causes significantly more friction than one that has a 3/4-inch or a full inch diameter. If your home is full of 1/2-inch pipes, replacing the ones that are easily accessible with 3/4-inch pipe will make a noticeable difference. Paying a professional to come in and replace all the plumbing with 3/4-inch pipe will make an enormous difference. People building a new home can upgrade from 1/2-inch pipe to 3/4-inch pipe for a relatively low price and save a lot of hassle in the long run.

Blockage Might be the Problem
Low water pressure can also be caused by blockages or chemical buildup in pipes. Water leaves small mineral deposits (often calcium) as it travels through plumbing. If enough of these deposits stick to the inside of the pipe, they reduce the diameter through which the water can flow (which in turn increases the friction, and so on). Since mineral buildup large enough to affect flow can easily be seen, examining a sample section of pipe from a fixture where the water pressure is low can identify this problem. Chemicals can be used to break down and flush out mineral buildup in these cases but be careful about which chemicals you put down your drains.

Recent Posts

Leave a Comment

CALL FOR SERVICE

(281) 645-5039

POST YOUR COMMENT

WRITE A REVIEW

HAVE A QUESTION?

EMAIL USEMAIL US

Contact Us

We're not around right now. But you can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Not readable? Change text.
Call Us